Much of the most brazen crime does come from repeat offenders

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Donald Trump’s campaign has leveraged the fear that crime and terror, asymmetrically executed, is more likely to affect “white” or well-off Americans than in the past.  In my own books, especially the 2014 DADT-III, I’ve argued that “inherited” inequality, down to a personal level, may drive some of this kind of crime.

But the remarks by outgoing police chief of Washington DC, Cathy Lanier, indicated that many crimes in Washington DC are committed by repeated offenders, sometimes on probation or parole.  In one case,  a wave of robberies occurred when a suspect’s GPS monitor failed.  Lanier says that the justice system, as well as police, must do its job.  The major story is in the Washington Post Metro Section Tuesday, September 6, 2016, by Peter Hermann and Clarence Williams.

Even the “poorer” Northeast section of Washington DC is becoming gentrified, as increasing rents drive poor people out (along with serious issues in maintaining affordable apartments for larger families, which sometimes are immigrant – and as we saw in Silver Spring recently, proper maintenance and fire safety in these buildings is a serious problem.)  But this is a marked contrast to the riots of 1968 along portions of 14th St NW.

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Meanwhile, media reports on the record killings in one area of Chicago, which largely seem related to gangs, some of whom who could have connections to drug cartels (but not radical Islam), for example, this Sun Times story about a trial with anonymous jurors.  Or take this story of a gratuitous shooting of an elderly man watering his lane over a wallet. You have a population of young men growing up with the idea that nothing in life is earned at all.

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Rcahel Weiner writes about arrests of young adults drawn into terrorism (specifically in northern Virginia( in the Washington Post Sunday. September 4, Metro Section, “A nexus of unremarkable lives and terrorism”    People combine an absolutist belief system with a desire to belong to a movement.  It’s strange for people who went through the Vietnam era draft contemplating young men wanting to out and fight overseas for a “cause”.

(Posted: Wednesday, September 7, 2016 at 7 PM EDT)